Stuttering Anticipation: Observing the Unobservable

Stuttering anticipation, the moment you know you are about to stutter but it hasn’t happened yet, is an unobservable yet very common phenomenon experienced by people who stutter, and a topic that is largely discussed at AIS.

In our latest speaker series, Dr. Eric Jackson, Assistant Professor and Director of the Stuttering and Vvariablity (SaVvy) Laboratory from NYU led an evidence-based discussion to shed light on the relationship between stuttering anticipation and fluency.

Interested in learning more? Check out this NYU Steinhardt blog post featuring Dr. Jackson’s research. You can also download the Stuttering Anticipation Scale (SAS) measurement tool to track your stuttering anticipation.

If you weren’t able to attend this speaker series, the full discussion is available in the video below. Check out more videos on our Youtube channel or here on our website.

List of References:

Jackson, et al. “My Client Knows That He’s About to Stutter: How Can We Address Stuttering Anticipation during Therapy with Young People Who Stutter?” Seminars in Speech and Language, August 24, 2018.

Jackson, ES, Yaruss, JS, Quesal, RW, Terranova, V, & Whalen, DH (2015). Responses of adults who stutter to the anticipation of stuttering. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 45, 38-51.

The American Institute for Stuttering is a leading non-profit organization whose primary mission is to provide universally affordable, state-of-the-art speech therapy to people of all ages who stutter, guidance to their families, and much-needed clinical training to speech professionals wishing to gain expertise in stuttering. Offices are located in New York, NY and Atlanta, GA, and services are also available Online. Our mission extends to advancing public and scholarly understanding of this often misunderstood disorder

By |2019-01-11T11:15:58+00:00January 11th, 2019|Research, Therapy for Stuttering|0 Comments


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